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Achieving Agricultural Development through Agricultural Trade
in Southern Africa

An IPC Trade Capacity Building Seminar


29 February 2004, 10:00-18:00

Sandton Convention Center

Johannesburg, South Africa


As the world food and agricultural system becomes increasingly global, it has become clear that agricultural trade policies, both in developed and developing countries, have a powerful effect on agricultural development. The agricultural trade negotiations taking place at the WTO under the Doha Development Round, as well as regional and bilateral negotiations, offer many avenues for pursuing trade reforms. But, stakeholders in developing countries, often including Ministries of Agriculture, farmers and local agribusiness representatives, are not part of the process of setting priorities and establishing goals for the outcome of trade negotiations.   Their estrangement from the process can prevent trade negotiators from having a full understanding of what the agricultural community needs from a trade agreement.

The International Food & Agricultural Trade Policy Council (IPC)  presented a seminar on February 29, 2004 in Johannesburg, South Africa to address these issues.  The seminar  brought together government officials, farmers, and other agricultural stakeholders in the region to discuss the role that agricultural trade can play in economic development and to relate that role to trade negotiations at the multilateral, regional and bilateral levels. A review of the proceedings of the seminar entitled Opportunities and Challenges for African Agricultural Development, has been published (Click Here).

The program was based on a series of seminars carried out by the IPC in summer and fall 2002 for developing country trade negotiators in Geneva entitled Achieving the Doha Development Agenda.  The Geneva seminar series provided practical advice and a forum for open discussion with IPC members - former agricultural trade negotiators from the United States, European Union and Canada; agribusiness executives and other trade experts - but also with other negotiators. Participants in the Geneva seminars cited a need for similar ‘real world’ advice and information to flow to officials in capitals as well as the broader community of agricultural stakeholders.  In response, the IPC developed the Capacity Building Program, Achieving Agricultural Development through Agricultural Trade.  A second trade capacity building seminar will take place in 2005 in Southeast Asia.  

The seminars and publications associated with the program will address how countries can benefit from agricultural trade The IPC seminars will increase interaction between and within the governments of each region.  Furthermore, by including agricultural stakeholders outside of the government, the IPC intends to increase openness, transparency and understanding of the agricultural trade system.

For questions, please contact IPC Communications Director, Kari Heerman at heerman@agritrade.org. This seminar was made possible by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).   

Agenda, Papers and Presentations

Proceedings

Agenda
Achieving Agricultural Development through Agricultural Trade

09:30 - 10:00 Registration

  

10:00 - 10:30

Opening Remarks

Dirk du Toit, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, South Africa
10:30 - 11:40 Session One: What do developing countries need from trade negotiations?

In this session, speakers discuss the key outcomes that developing country agricultural interests should be pushing their governments to achieve in trade negotiations.  Speakers also consider what policies developing country agricultural interests should ask their governments to implement to create an environment that would enable them to take advantage of the opportunities presented by more open trade.

Robert L. Thompson, IPC Chairman and Former Director of Rural Development, World Bank

Percy Wachata Misika, Minister Counselor, Agriculture, Embassy of Namibia in Paris
         
Paper / Presentation: Microsoft PowerPoint Version / Microsoft Word Version

Michel Petit, Professor Institut National Agronomique, France and Former Director of Rural Development, World Bank
         
Presentation: Microsoft PowerPoint Version / Microsoft Word Version  

Ajay Vashee, President, Southern African Confederation of Agricultural Unions

11:50 - 13:00 Session Two: Being Heard: Integrating Agriculture's Views into Trade Policy Making

In this session, panelists discuss how the needs of the agricultural community can best be communicated to those responsible for trade policy.

Mike Gifford, Former Trade Negotiator, Canada

Nicholas Sabwa, Former Trade Negotiator, Kenya

Hans van der Merwe, Chief Executive, Agri SA

Rodger Stewart, President, World Association of Beet and Cane Growers
          
Paper

13:00 - 14:10 Lunch
 
14:10 - 15:20 Session Three: Regional Trade Agreements: Promise and Opportunity

In this session, speakers discuss the key outcomes that developing country agricultural interests should be pushing their governments to achieve in regional trade negotiations.  Speakers also consider the overall costs and benefits of further regional integration, its ability to create more opportunities for agricultural trade and its implications for multilateral trade negotiations.

Shem Simuyemba, Trade Policy Specialist, Regional Agricultural Trade Expansion (RATES) Program, COMESA
           Presentation: Microsoft PowerPoint Version / Microsoft Word Version

Nicholas Sabwa, Former Trade Negotiator, Kenya
           
Paper: Adobe .pdf Version

15:30 - 16:40 Session Four: The Doha Development Agenda: How does the Derbez Text Measure Up?

In Session Four, panelists analyze the Derbez Text's strengths and weaknesses from their particular perspective. The IPC presented its recommendations for improving the Derbez text in this session.

Mike Gifford, Former Trade Negotiator, Canada

Michael MacDonald, Head of Economics, SEIFSA

M. Ann Tutwiler, Chief Executive, International Food & Agricultural Trade Policy Council (IPC)
           
Presentation: Microsoft PowerPoint Version / Microsoft Word Version

David Vanzetti, Trade Analysis Branch, UNCTAD
           
Presentation: Microsoft PowerPoint Version / Microsoft Word Version

Nduati Kariuki, Chairman, Kenya National Federation of Agricultural Producers (KENFAP)

16:50 - 18:00 Session Five: What Can Doha Deliver? Political Constraints and Opportunities

In this session, panelists give frank estimations of some reasonable outcomes of the Doha Round agricultural negotiations given the political realities driving the process.Panelists inform participants about the challenges that decision makers are facing and discuss where opportunities for compromise may exist.

The WTO: Alex Werth, International Center for Trade and Sustainable Development (ICTSD)

The European Union: Michel Petit, Professor Institut National Agronomique, France and Former Director of Rural Development, World Bank
          
Presentation: Microsoft PowerPoint Version / Microsoft Word Version

The United States: M. Ann Tutwiler, IPC Chief Executive

Information / Agenda / Proceedings

The IPC would like to thank the United States Department of  Agriculture for supporting this program.